Wisconsin adds 4,205 coronavirus cases, record 48 COVID-19 deaths; death rate goes back up – WBAY

MADISON, Wis. (WBAY) – Wisconsin added 48 COVID-19 related deaths on Wednesday, bringing the state’s death toll to 1,681 and bringing the death rate up from 0.91% to 0.92% — the first time we’ve seen that metric rise since June 6.

The deaths were reported in 30 counties: Brown, Buffalo, Chippewa, Clark, Dodge, Eau Claire, Florence (2), Fond du Lac (2), Grant (2), Green, Jefferson, Kenosha (3), Manitowoc, Marathon, Milwaukee (2), Monroe, Oneida (2), Outagamie (4), Portage, Racine (3), Sauk, Shawano, Sheboygan 92), Taylor, Vilas, Walworth, Waukesha (2), Waupaca (4), Waushara and Winnebago (2).

POSITIVE CASES

The Department of Health Services added 4,205 more confirmed coronavirus cases. That’s almost 400 fewer cases than Tuesday but still much higher than the numbers we were seeing a week ago. Only one county — Iron — did not have a newly confirmed case.

The state cautioned that it’s going to take days to work through a backlog of positive test results after computer system was taken down for upgrades over the weekend and only negative tests could be imported — resulting in a high number of newly reported coronavirus cases and extremely high positivity rate. (Wednesday’s positivity is 42.53% of the 9,886 test results.)

The state emphasizes the 7-day rolling averages are a more accurate representation of the state’s COVID-19 situation while it works through the backlog of data for the next few days. Wisconsin is averaging 3,727 confirmed coronavirus cases every day and the state reports the 7-day positivity rate averages 22.6%.

For data that counts all of the results for people tested multiple times, visit the DHS website. Even by that measure, the positivity rate has been climbing for two weeks; the 7-day average is at a new high of 12.3%. Action 2 News will continue to emphasize the state’s summary statistics counting each person once no matter how many times they’re tested. This is the standard method used by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in its federal reporting and is a better indication of the spread of the coronavirus in a community.

ACTIVE CASES

The percentage of active cases rose above 21% (21.1%) and inactive cases have fallen to 78% of all cases. More than 1 in 5 people ever diagnosed with coronavirus in Wisconsin was diagnosed within the last 30 days and hasn’t been medically cleared. The state reports 38,485 confirmed cases are still active while 142,485 people are considered recovered.

HOSPITALIZATIONS

The state reports 167 people were hospitalized for COVID-19 in the past 24 hour period. That’s much fewer than the record 218 hospitalizations reported Tuesday but is the second-highest one-day tally.

With deaths and hospital discharges, the current number of COVID-19 patients in hospitals and ICU have slipped from all-time highs. There are currently 1,190 COVID-19 patients in the state’s 134 hospitals, with 299 of them in ICU. That’s 16 fewer in ICU and 2 fewer overall than Tuesday. The 7-day average is about 159 patients a day. Since February, more than 1 in 20 people who tested positive for the coronavirus (5.3%) had COVID-19 symptoms that required hospitalization.

Wednesday, the first patient was admitted to the alternate care facility (ACF) set up at the Wisconsin State Fair Park near Milwaukee. To protect patient privacy, the DHS won’t say where the patient is from. The facility opened a week ago with the intent of handling an overflow at hospitals around the state by receiving patients who are closer to discharge but not quite healthy enough, to make room for people with more serious conditions. The facility is funded through the CARES Act; there’s no charge to patients or their insurers for being transported to and from their home area hospitals or receiving care at the ACF.

HOSPITAL READINESS

Statewide, 13.3% of ICU beds and 14.8% of all medical beds are open. That’s down from 13.6% of ICU beds and 16.3% of all beds the day before.

In the 13 hospitals in the 8-county Fox Valley region, there are 131 COVID-19 patients, with 21 in ICU. The WHA says 17 beds in intensive care open (16.3%) and 8.6% of all medical beds. The 10 hospitals in the 7-county Northeast region are caring for 166 COVID-19 patients, 52 in ICU. There are 19 intensive care beds (8.9%) open, and 12.8% of all medical beds.

Prevea CEO/president Dr. Ashok Rai cautioned on Action 2 News This Morning last week that an open bed isn’t necessarily an available bed if the hospital doesn’t have the staffing to support a patient in it (see related story).

WEDNESDAY’S COUNTY CASE NUMBERS (counties with new cases are indicated in bold)

Wisconsin

  • Adams – 425 cases (+11) (4 deaths)
  • Ashland – 246 cases (+7) (3 deaths)
  • Barron – 858 cases (+31) (6 deaths)
  • Bayfield – 186 cases (+2) (1 death)
  • Brown – 13,645 cases (+230) (87 deaths) (+1)
  • Buffalo – 219 cases (+6) (3 deaths) (+1)
  • Burnett – 282 cases (+5) (6 deaths)
  • Calumet – 2,373 cases (+46) (11 deaths)
  • Chippewa – 1,215 cases (+85) (7 deaths) (+1)
  • Clark – 714 cases (+29) (13 deaths) (+1)
  • Columbia – 1,534 cases (+30) (4 deaths)
  • Crawford – 300 cases (+3)
  • Dane – 13,121 cases (+300) (46 deaths)
  • Dodge – 3,280 cases (+130) (23 deaths) (+1)
  • Door – 668 cases (+17) (4 deaths)
  • Douglas – 707 cases (+6) (1 death)
  • Dunn – 900 cases (+16) (1 death)
  • Eau Claire – 2,783 cases (+47) (12 deaths) (+1)
  • Florence – 186 cases (+14) (6 deaths) (+2)
  • Fond du Lac – 3,741 cases (+53) (19 deaths) (+2)
  • Forest – 413 cases (+12) (10 deaths)
  • Grant – 1,646 cases (+23) (27 deaths) (+2)
  • Green – 846 cases (+18) (5 deaths) (+1)
  • Green Lake – 632 cases (+14) (2 deaths)
  • Iowa – 401 cases (+16) (1 death)
  • Iron – 170 cases (1 death)
  • Jackson – 309 cases (+10) (1 death)
  • Jefferson – 2,356 cases (+48) (10 deaths) (+1)
  • Juneau – 693 cases (+18) (4 deaths)
  • Kenosha – 4,557 cases (+78) (74 deaths) (+3)
  • Kewaunee – 968 cases (+31) (5 deaths)
  • La Crosse – 3,907 cases (+39) (15 deaths)
  • Lafayette – 471 case (+5) (1 death)
  • Langlade – 754 cases (+50) (8 deaths)
  • Lincoln – 617 cases (+14) (5 deaths)
  • Manitowoc – 2,347 cases (+89) (8 deaths) (+1)
  • Marathon – 3,699 cases (+168) (39 deaths) (+1)
  • Marinette – 1,502 cases (+24) (11 deaths)
  • Marquette – 537 cases (+9) (2 deaths)
  • Menominee – 252 cases (+13)
  • Milwaukee – 36,706 (+647) (559 deaths) (+2)
  • Monroe – 989 cases (+29) (4 deaths) (+1)
  • Oconto – 1,877 cases (+60) (8 deaths)
  • Oneida – 1,025 cases (+58) (8 deaths) (+2)
  • Outagamie – 8,183 cases (+157) (55 deaths) (+4)
  • Ozaukee – 1,992 cases (+53) (23 deaths)
  • Pepin – 102 cases (+9)
  • Pierce – 619 cases (+7) (7 deaths)
  • Polk – 445 cases (+26) (2 deaths)
  • Portage – 2,397 cases (+66) (18 deaths) (+1)
  • Price – 299 cases (+6)
  • Racine – 6,575 cases (+121) (105 deaths) (+3)
  • Richland – 404 cases (+14) (6 deaths)
  • Rock – 4,292 cases (+101) (39 deaths)
  • Rusk – 160 cases (+8) (1 death)
  • Sauk – 1,511 cases (+26) (7 deaths) (+1)
  • Sawyer – 350 cases (+1) (1 death)
  • Shawano – 2,093 cases (+95) (15 deaths) (+1)
  • Sheboygan – 3,995 cases (+156) (22 deaths) (+2)
  • St. Croix – 1,550 cases (+83) (9 deaths)
  • Taylor – 395 cases (+13) (7 deaths) (+1)
  • Trempealeau – 910 cases (+14) (2 deaths)
  • Vernon – 450 cases (+16) (3 deaths)
  • Vilas – 459 cases (+11) (4 deaths) (+1)
  • Walworth – 3,157 cases (+43) (37 deaths) (+1)
  • Washburn – 206 cases (+6) (2 deaths)
  • Washington – 4,028 cases (+110) (41 deaths)
  • Waukesha – 10,923 cases (+347) (108 deaths) (+2)
  • Waupaca – 2,065 cases (+34) (36 deaths) (+4)
  • Waushara – 837 cases (+20) (4 deaths) (+1)
  • Winnebago – 7,807 cases (+84) (53 deaths) (+2)
  • Wood – 1,426 cases (+37) (9 deaths)

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula**

  • Alger – 77 cases (+2) (1 death)
  • Baraga – 62 cases (4 deaths)
  • Chippewa – 66 cases
  • Delta – 916 cases (+30) (19 deaths) (+1)
  • Dickinson – 493 cases (+6) (12 deaths) (+3)
  • Gogebic – 224 cases (+6) (1 death)
  • Houghton – 726 cases (+16) (7 deaths)
  • Iron – 353 cases (+4) (20 deaths) (+1)
  • Keweenaw – 17 cases
  • Luce – 34 cases (+2)
  • Mackinac – 117 cases (+3)
  • Marquette – 725 cases (12 deaths) (cases revised -5 by state)
  • Menominee – 559 cases (+11) (3 deaths)
  • Ontonagon – 69 cases (+1)
  • Schoolcraft – 53 cases (+2)

* Viewers have asked us why the state has different numbers than what’s reported on some county health department websites. The DHS reports cases from all health departments within a county’s boundaries, including tribal, municipal and county health departments; county websites may not. Also, public health departments update their data at various times whereas the DHS freezes the numbers it receives by the same time every day to compile the afternoon report.

The DHS reports deaths attributed to COVID-19 or in which COVID-19 contributed to their death. Most of the people severely affected by the coronavirus have underlying illnesses or conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease or obesity, which raises a person’s risk of dying from COVID-19 but would’ve lived longer if not for their infection. The state may revise case and death numbers after further review, such as the victim’s residence, duplicated records, or a correction in lab results. Details can be found on the DHS website and Frequently Asked Questions.

**The state of Michigan does not update numbers on Sundays.

Symptoms

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified these as possible symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Fever of 100.4 or higher
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Prevention

  • The coronavirus is a new, or “novel,” virus. Nobody has a natural immunity to it. Children and teens seem to recover best from the virus. Older people and those with underlying health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are considered at high risk, according to the CDC. Precautions are also needed around people with developing or weakened immune systems.
  • To help prevent the spread of the virus:
  • Stay at least six feet away from other people
  • Avoid close contact with people who are or appear sick
  • Stay at home as much as possible
  • Cancel events and avoid groups, gatherings, play dates and nonessential appointments
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care
  • Wash your hands regularly for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a mask. At a minimum, use a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.

Health experts say face masks are still the most effective way the general public can slow the spread of the coronavirus, but only if the masks are worn appropriately — over the nose and chin. County and state health officials are reminding and urging people to stay home when they feel sick, avoid large gatherings, and distance yourself six feet from people who aren’t from your household.

To help people understand how their decisions affect their own health and others, the Department of Health Services has a decision tool at https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/covid-19/decision.htm. The tool describes how choices matter and offers suggestions to make activities safer.

Copyright 2020 WBAY. All rights reserved.

Source: wbay.com

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